Category Archives: Book Review

The Forgotten Road

Forgotten Road

Maya Angelou wrote a book called, Wouldn’t Take Nothing for My Journey Now.  Well in The Forgotten Road (Richard Paul Evans), Charles James takes a long unexpected journey.  He is a highly successful businessman who is presumed to have died in a plane crash.  But as fate would have it, he did not board the flight because he ran back to get his bag.

Yet, when he decides to attend his memorial service in disguise, he sees that the place is basically empty.   He realizes that it is the perfect time to use this opportunity to take a long walk. He sets out on the old Route 66 and his goal is to end up in California where he hopes to make amends with his former wife, Monica.

Each town teaches him something about the American landscape but more importantly, he has time to take a look within himself.  He has a backpack full of cash because he is a multimillionaire so supply is no problem for him. He meets many interesting everyday people along the way and some leave greater imprints than others.

One woman saves his life by giving him a ride in a dangerous area.  He rewards her richly.  Another man makes him take a deeper look into his spiritual beliefs when he shares his near-death experience.  Charles is left plenty of time to ponder his life more deeply and each encounter further pounds into his psyche.

Probably, the most memorable character is Eddie, a Mexican migrant worker.  Charles is forced to live and work as a migrant worker after he was is robbed by a motorcycle gang.  His soul is opened while living that life for a week.  He sees how the workers have to take whatever they are given because they are undocumented and have no other recourse.

Ultimately he is forced to look at his father’s life towards whom he still harbored a strong resentment. His father, also a migrant worker, was harsh and treated Charles as he had been treated by his father.   Charles soon realizes that those circumstances helped to shape him into becoming a financial success.

Now, if he would add a dose of humility, kindness and love, he could work towards becoming a whole person. He breaks down and calls his assistant, Amanda because he is out of cash.  After she is slowly convinced that it is indeed him, she shows up at his hotel.  She tells him that he  has changed.  She notices a greater calm and peace.

At the end of the book, Charles has only made it halfway across the country. Readers will have to wait for the sequel to see what happens when he gets to California.  He fully intends to complete his walk which will end up at Monica’s doorstep at the end of Route 66!

 

Lynn M.                                                            August 4, 2018

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Sparks Fly!

My first encounter with the whole concept of mail-order brides was when I saw Glenn Close and Christopher Walken in the movie Sarah, Plain and Tall.  I didn’t know about this piece of Amercan history. I later picked up the book by Patricia MacLachlan to get an added perspective from the original writer.

Just think of the risks taken by both the man ordering the bride and the brave woman who traveled during the stagecoach days to meet a total stranger.  In this piece, they both agreed to keep their vows and often life in the West was so challenging that they rarely had time to really get to know each other.

Remembering the gruffness of Christopher Walken, one would wonder if love was ever a part of the deal.  Gwen Close was busy learning the harshness of the Western plains and raising his children.  What a life!  Yet when Close was almost lost in a storm, I believe he realized how much he valued and treasured her presence.

Recently, I visited my local library and picked up a book called Beneath the Prairie Moon by Kim Vogel Sawyer.  I was drawn to its cover and did not realize that it was about mail-order brides until I started reading the book.

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It is 1888 in Spiveyville, Kansas.  Over sixteen men have paid a fee for a mail-order bride and are waiting for their arrival from Newton, Massachusetts.  However, when they go to meet the stagecoach, only two women get out.  They are the owner, Helena Bingham and her assistant, Abigail Grant.

The men are shocked and dismayed and even more so when they discover the plans of these Eastern women.  The men must take a variety of classes in etiquette so that they will know how to treat a lady. Of course, they are outraged, but with the Sherriff’s protection of the women, the prairie men soon comply and go along.

Needless to say, there are a few bumps in the road and the women’s stay is unexpectedly lengthened.  The women have to put their airs and hoity-toity ways on the back burner as they are forced to dig in and find ways to survive prairie life.

The men soften some too and the classes get underway, until the unthinkable happens.  Helena Bingham, the owner of the matchmaking business, disappears. Everyone puts their aside their warring ways and aid in the search for her.

Will Helena Bingham be found alive?  Will the men complete their classes on etiquette?  And most importantly, will their brides that they have paid for arrive from the East? Get this book and watch the sparks fly up and see where they land!

Lynn M.                                                                            July 21, 2018

Our Souls at Night: Book to Film

Our Souls at night-bookIsn’t nice when a writer leaves a screenwriter some material that he or she can mold and make come to life?  Well, the late Kent Haruf did just that when he wrote Our Souls at Night.  I happened to pick it up from the New Books Shelf at the public library.

The plot is unique where a widow knocks on her neighbor’s door who is a widower and asks him to do something quite unusual.  She, Addie Moore, asks him to come over and spend the nights with her. She admits that the nights are the hardest for her and she simply wants to talk.

Louis Waters, a former high school teacher, is taken aback and quietly contemplates her offer.  They both have been alone for years and ultimately each feels that there is little to lose. So, on the next night, he travels through the alley with his pajamas and a toothbrush in a paperback. He knocks on her back door and thus, the story unfolds.

In the small town where they live, tongues start wagging but they are in their seventies and they are quite oblivious to what others think about their actions. They proceed and share many intimate details of their lives.

She talks about the tragic loss of her young daughter who was hit by a car.  Both her husband and son basically shut down and their marriage suffered along with the loss of any intimacy.  He, on the other hand, had an affair with a school teacher which almost ruined his marriage and did indeed destroy the other woman’s marriage.

Both Addie and Louis continue their new routine and at one point, they decide to make a public showing.  As others gawk, they walk down a main street arm in arm.  Just as they are reveling in their new-found friendship, the unthinkable happens.

Addie’s son calls and says that his wife has abandoned the family and that his finances are in shambles.  He asks her to take in her seven-year old grandson Jamie for the summer. This leaves Louis wondering how and if he will fit into the new scenario.

Fortunately, Jamie is in need of a lot of comfort, so the three of them have a number of experiences that help them bond.  He accepts and gets used to Louis coming over at night; they play catch ball; they go on a hike in the mountains and Louis gets him a dog as a reassuring companion.

And then, crash.  Gene, Addie’s son comes to her house outraged that she is allowing Louis to stay over around his son and things get pretty salty.  It was a prime example of how some people cannot run their own lives, but they still feel the need to control others.

As I was reading the book, I met a woman who saw the cover and told me that Our Souls at Night had been made into a movie.  To my astonishment, not only was it a movie, it starred Jane Fonda and Robert Redford.  Who knew?  I was excited and knew that I had to compare the two after finishing the book.

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Afterwards, I was able to see a blurred version of the 2017 movie on You Tube which I observed closely. The script pretty much followed the book with a few exceptions.  In the book, Louis used a family of mice to entertain little Jamie but the movie chose an electric train set instead.  Also, the movie added a scene which included Louis’ adult daughter Holly.  And most importantly, it minimized the son’s aversion to their union and this made for a much lighter ending.

When I finished the book, I was a bit disturbed because Addie was so vulnerable and was being victimized by her controlling son.  He made her leave her house after she experienced a fall.  She was subjected to him and his yelling wife who had returned home.  Addie had to sneak and call Louis to talk and it made me think of Romeo and Juliet’s tragic ending.

However, the movie’s ending was more tolerable and it left me feeling hopeful.  Yes, she did move in with her son and grandson after having a fall, but in the movie, the wife did not return home. It seemed like a more peaceful living arrangement for the three of them.  And yes, she does call Louis but she does not sneak and it signals a happy continuation of their relationship.

Thank goodness for great writers and thank goodness for optimistic screenwriters who know the importance of leaving their viewers with a good feeling!

Lynn M.                                                         June 9, 2018